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Flex 6500 v Flex 6600

Is there anyplace I can see a side by side comparison between the Flex 6500 and the new Flex 6600 (non-M version)?

The only reason I'm looking is because I have long wanted the ability of RX A and RX B as well as XVTR A and XVTR B and be able to set two slices one for 70cm (transverter) and one for 2m (transverter) and have the ability to transmit and/or receive on either without switches... and from what I am seeing the 6600 has that ability (well it has the ports)

The other thing I'd like to see is any other differences between the two Radio's.

Thanks

David
KK4QOE

Answers

  • Tim - W4TMETim - W4TME Administrator, FlexRadio Employee admin
    edited June 23
    1.) The 6600 is expected to have slightly better receiver performance.  It hasn't been measured so I do not have any hard numbers to share.

    2.) The 6600 will have 2 SCUs for diversity reception and for using multiple antennas at the same time.  This add RX-B to the 6600.

    3.) The 6600 will have higher rejection out of band preselectors (7th order vs 3rd order filters) for the contest bands

    4.) The 6600 will have 2 XVTR ports

    5.) The 6600 costs less than a 6500

  • dlwarnbergdlwarnberg Member
    edited May 2017
    Thank you Tim
  • Tim - W4TMETim - W4TME Administrator, FlexRadio Employee admin
    edited May 2017
    You're very welcome

  • KF4HRKF4HR Member ✭✭
    edited May 2017
    Tim - does the 6400/6600 units utilize a upgradeable module design, similar to what Elecraft has done with their K3/K3S? 
  • Tim - W4TMETim - W4TME Administrator, FlexRadio Employee admin
    edited May 2017
    There is modularity built into the 6400/6600 primarily for serviceability and it may be used in the future to deliver optional feature and performance enhancements.  

    I cannot comment regarding a comparison of one radio's build architecture vs. another.  I just don't have enough requisite knowledge of the K3's details to provide an informed answer.
  • dlwarnbergdlwarnberg Member
    edited May 2017
    Couple things, on the 6600 back panel I think I see a "REM ON" port, is that to power the unit on and off remotely, i.e. remote on?

    And MARS unlock is that still handled by TURF file or some other method?

    Thanks

    David
  • Tim - W4TMETim - W4TME Administrator, FlexRadio Employee admin
    edited May 2017
    on the 6600 back panel I think I see a "REM ON" port, is that to power the unit on and off remotely, i.e. remote on?

    Yes, just like all 6000s

    And MARS unlock is that still handled by TURF file or some other method?

    You will need to purchase the extended transmit filter module as the 6400 and 6600  by default will not come with PA filters for out of ham band transmit.  Once the module is installed, a TURF file is required.  This is referenced in the FAQ that was updated yesterday.
  • MooseMoose Member ✭✭
    edited May 2017
    If the 6600 is a better radio than a 6500, then why does a 6500 cost more?

    73 Chris AK4SK
  • Ken - NM9PKen - NM9P Member ✭✭
    edited May 2017
    I would imagine that SOME of the price savings comes from not needing to include the out-of-band transmit filters that are included in the 6500, as well as chassis changes eliminating the chassis mounted 8-pin Foster and XLR/TRS Mic connectors, or 1/4 inch headphone & keyer paddle jacks.  These have already been commented publicly.  

    I would guess that the rest - i.e. component selection, economies of scale, and other production costs, would likely enter into the calculations.  They haven't said anything about this, but it would make perfect sense that 5 years later there would be many ways to make a better rig for less money.

    Ken - NM9P
  • MooseMoose Member ✭✭
    edited May 2017
    Thanks Ken.
  • Manuel MasedaManuel Maseda Member
    edited May 2017
    Don't forget elimination of the OLED display
  • Chris Tate  - N6WMChris Tate - N6WM Member ✭✭
    edited May 2017
    And Moore's law
  • NX6D DaveNX6D Dave Member
    edited January 2018
    Economies of scale.  Flex is a small company manufacturing a high-value product, and it needs to make money to employ people, create new products and stay in business.  When volumes are low, prices need to be high.

    As a privately held company, they don't need to say anything about their product volume or the amount of money that flows through the company.  But notice that Gerald and others have said in the last couple of years that sales volumes have been surprisingly high.  Maestro is an example.

    I think we are now seeing the effects of economies of scale.  When production runs are higher, unit costs are lower, margins per unit can be lower.
  • MooseMoose Member ✭✭
    edited May 2017
    Yeah, just a curiosity I had about the price.
  • FrankPFrankP Member
    edited January 2018
    Hi Tim. I know your post was 8 months ago but I pulled it up as part of my research ad to whether I should get a used 6500 or new 6600. I see now that I can get a used 6500 from Flex for $2999.00 vs $3999.00 for a 6600. So for me, new Flex but wanting a high performance transceiver to replace my FTDX3000, do you think I'd be happy with the 6500 saving $1000.00? Pr eould i midd the dual SCU's Thanks Frank WA3RSL
  • KC2QMA_JohnKC2QMA_John Member ✭✭
    edited January 2018
    Holy Cow the 6500 is light years better than the FTDX 3000 if you need to save some money the 6500 will **** your mind!
  • FrankPFrankP Member
    edited January 2018
    My research confirms your comment!
  • KY6LA_HowardKY6LA_Howard La Jolla, CA. Paris and Sablet FranceMember ✭✭✭
    edited January 2018

    Depends if you want to use multiple antennas at the same time on same or different bands.

    If so, then the 6600 with 2SCU's wins hands down because it gives you full duplex and diversity capability. 

  • Ken - NM9PKen - NM9P Member ✭✭
    edited January 2018
    FrankP, I own a 6500 and had put a deposit on a trade-up to a 6600, but some things have changed in my world which will delay that about a year....

    Which you choose will depend upon what you want to do with the rig.

    If you want to do SO2R contesting with the same rig,

    or if you would like to monitor widely divergent bands at the same time - like 6 & 160, or 80 & 10,

    or if you would benefit from 7th order bandpass filters on the rig,

    or if you want to do diversity reception, using two different antennas on the same band to reduce noise...

    Then you will want to spend the extra for the 6600.

    If NONE of that interests you, then you will still be blown away by the 6500!  It is STILL one of the best rigs available, even though it is discontinued!

    Ken - NM9P
  • FrankPFrankP Member
    edited January 2018
    Thanks guys!
  • RiaRia Member ✭✭
    edited January 2018
    If you're doing SO2R in a single radio you need the 6600 (or 6700).

    Ria

  • Ken - NM9PKen - NM9P Member ✭✭
    edited January 2018
    I forgot to add the ability to have two transverters connected and operating at the same time - I.e. 2 Meters and 70 cm full duplex for contesting or satellite operation!
  • Mark_WS7MMark_WS7M Member ✭✭
    edited January 2018
    I will upgrade to the 6600 but probably will be waiting for the fury to die down.  Let FRS get caught up some. 

    I like the feature set in the 6600 personally.


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