SDR with Built in Computer

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Years back I remember when Flexradio developed the 5000C. Which was a Flex 5000 with a built in computer. It was loaded with Windows XP and also the PSDR program to operate the Flex.
It would be nice to see if something could be done like that for the new Flex 6000 series of SDR's. One wouldn't have to worry about making sure their PC was up to snuff for the Flex 6000 series. Plus, one could have their logger and other skimmers on the PC. I wonder if Flexradio ever thought about doing that?
Mark Griffin, KB3Z
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Mark Griffin

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Posted 2 years ago

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Neal - K3NC, Elmer

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To a major extent, thats what the 6400M and the 6600M are! You cannot run your own programs so thats the issue you have. You will still need a computer to run digital/ voice messages and logging programs, etc.

Its a fast changing world and Flex made a very unexpected move this hamvention (even to us Alpha Team members) so there is no telling what next year will unfold.

However, until then, there are some fantastic ham computers at www.abrohamnealsoftware.com/products.php (sorry, I just had to do it!)

73
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Ria - N2RJ, Elmer

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Talk about quick obsolescence! I think that would be a bad idea for a number of reasons. The typical hardware refresh cycle is 3-5 years.
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Rory - N6OIL

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Ria, would the SunSDR MB-1 fall into that category? Been a few of them come up on the used market maybe they are getting ready for the new 6000's.
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Ria - N2RJ, Elmer

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Yep, most definitely. That's why I was skeptical of them.
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Mark Griffin

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Hi Ria,
Long time no talk. Sorry about typing your Call Letters on the reflector incorrectly. I understand your point because most computers in a company are fully depreciated with 3 years.
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KF4HR

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My guess is FRS learned their lesson on the 5000C.  When it comes to Flex systems, it seems the component that is many times at the center of problems, and the component that FRS has little or no  control over, is either the Windows based computer, its OS, or OS upgrades.   
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Michael Coslo

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And how! Imagine if the W10 problems some of us are having would be based on an internal computer, and not our own. 
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Mark Griffin

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Funny that you mention the Expert MB1 SDR. I see a lot of video's on Youtube about the Expert. And of course there are a whole load of video's on the different Flex Models as well as Maestro. I would really love to see a video comparison between the Flexradio and the Expert MB1. Plus, being able to see Receiver Tests for the MB1 vs Flexradio.
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Steve K9ZW, Elmer

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Embedded PCs are a conundrum - to make them work well the "closed-system" like a Maestro is an option but it doesn't let the user do what they most likely want.

An open system is high risk and going to be obsolete/non-upgradable earlier than the owner will like.

Thinking there may be no "sweet spot" solution for an onboard user accessible PC version.

73

Steve

K9ZW


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Norm - W7CK

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That's exactly what the Maestro is.  It is similar to a tablet with buttons and knobs and runs Windows under the hood.
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Ria - N2RJ, Elmer

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The maestro is actually a tablet. I believe it's a dell or something. While it runs windows, it's not the same as the expert sunsdr MB-1. On the maestro you can't change the software. On the MB -1 you can run all of your software, like N1MM and fldigi.
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Clay N9IO

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Just googled the Expert MB1, I live in a bubble didn't know it existed.
Looks like a 7610 in a JRC box, I pass.
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Mark Griffin

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I enjoyed the various posts to this thought of mine. One thing I must add is that I have yet to see any Sherwood Engineering Data on the MB1. In fact I did write Rob Sherwood and he did try and test the MB1, but had a very difficult time connecting his PC to their unit. He did receive help from the people at Expert, but it never came to fruition. I would like to see some receiver tests done on the MB1 vs the Flex. That would be the telltale sign. If the flex is superior then great! But it seems like perhaps we will never know due to potential issues beyond our control.
(Edited)
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IW7DMH, Enzo

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Embedded PCs are a conundrum - to make them work well the "closed-system" like a Maestro is an option but it doesn't let the user do what they most likely want.

An open system is high risk and going to be obsolete/non-upgradable earlier than the owner will like.

Thinking there may be no "sweet spot" solution for an onboard user accessible PC version.

73
Steve
K9ZW

I think, at the moment, FRS can't do better than what is doing.
In the near future, tablet processors will have the same performances of PC processors so there could be a convergence of SSDR versions. This would give everyone the freedom to choose the embedded or the stand-alone solution without having to give up one or the other.
I think also, Flex should point its attention to the world of IoT and design an hw platform that can be freely extended.
I am wondering if SSDR for Windows PC has good performance on the Intel Cherry Trail Z8350 Quad Core Processor with 4Gb Ram.
If you do not know, it is the processor used in the "LattePanda", a single board computer designed for audio / video entertainment. It has all the desired connectivity (GB Eth, Wi-Fi, BT, USB-2/3), it has an integrated 7-inch touchscreen monitor and a HDMI video output. But most of all it has an embedded Arduino Leonardo, so adding a bunch of encoders and buttons would be very simple.
In other posts in the forum, many people asked for a simplified version of Maestro, but I don't think it is the best we can have. I would like FRS add to its catalog the "plain" printed circuit with the only encoders and buttons used on Maestro. 
KISS devices have more chances to go over obsolescence and all in all it would be a low cost/time operation.

73 'iw7dmh
Enzo

P.S.: I don't have any connection, nor I am involved, with Lattepanda.

(Edited)