Setting a static IP address question

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  • Updated 12 months ago

Here is the scenario.  I have a Hamshack computer connected to an ASUS 1gb N66 Router...I have a wireless Ethernet adapter (also ASUS N66 type) about 20ft away on a shelf over the garage.....I have a Flex 6300 radio also over the garage and connected to that wireless Ethernet adapter.   Sometimes when I get messing around I get a dropped connection and thus cannot remotely reconnect over the router LAN because the address apparently changes.

My Router DHCP list shows MAC addresses for all clients connected to the Router..  I found the one for the Wireless Ethernet adapter that the 6300 is connected to... is this the one I assign the static address to? or is it my PC or maybe both?   I was thinking of using an IP address 192.168.1.63 for the 6300...  is this OK?   Any help or explanation is welcome

Regards

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K1UO - Larry

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Posted 3 years ago

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Jon - KF2E

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I wouldn't try to assign a static address to the 6300. For now we can't program an IP into the 6000 series radios. Perhaps after 1.4 we will be able to. Since you can't assign an IP to the radio it must use DHCP to get an address from your router. Even though you can bind an IP to the Flex MAC address in the router it could potentially cause an issue. You are most likely loosing your connection over the wireless link and not because of the IP.

Jon...kf2e
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KY6LA - Howard, Elmer

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It is INCORRECT to say that you cannot set a Static IP

See below about how to set static IP to a 6000
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Guy G4DWV/4X1LT

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I cannot think of a case where giving a static IP to a piece of kit can cause an issue. I can think of many cases of the reverse. Even Tim from FRS does this, albeit another way by providing long IP lease times.
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KY6LA - Howard, Elmer

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If u fail to exclude the static IP Range from the DHCP Range, some inexpensive routers may assign a DHCP IP'in the Static Range when the static iP device is not present. Causing a potential conflict

Simple fix is to start the DHCP range outside of the static range Never have conflict problems then.
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George Molnar, KF2T, Elmer

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My MAC address starts with 50:56 for the 6500, yours may be similar.  Try an "arp -a" commend at the Windows command prompt to list what's in your system. That will let you know what your MAC address is (you can confirm by checking the IP address reported in settings/radio setup/radio in SSDR). Set the MAC address you find to a static address in your router. Restart everything and you should be good to go.

Also, make sure there is no more than one DHCP server running in your home network.
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KY6LA - Howard, Elmer

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Your IP assignment of 192.168.1.63 is OK

I personally have assigned FIXED IP addresses for my 6700 and all my hard wired LAN Connected computers and peripherals.   I set my DHCP range to start at xxx.xxx.xxx.101 and everything below  xxx.xxx.xxx.101 is used for fixed IP's

Why do I like fixed IP's ... It makes life much simpler... I operate remote much of the time... knowing where something is on my LAN just makes it much easier to troubleshoot than trying to guess which device has an issue.  Plus like in your case, when you drop a connection it is much easier to get it going again...

I use DHCP for the mobile devices such as iPhones, iPads that occasionally connect into my LAN...

Assignment is quite easy... As George says, Find the MAC address and set the static address in the router.   Static IP conflicts with your DHCP IP's are rare and can easily be eliminated by removing the fixed IP range from the DHCP assignment table.

If you are losing connections, it is possibly some of those very annoying "Green" features that seem to have crept into modern routers which try to save power by shutting down router ports and functionality.   While the Green feature might be relevant in a Server Farm..It makes minimal difference in a 1 router system to save a couple of watts... Read your manual and shut off all the Green Features...
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Ken - NM9P, Elmer

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Howard,
I have been trying to set Fixed or Reserved IP addresses on my ATT Uverse (Motorola) Modem/Router and cannot find any instructions in the manual... not even a text-based backdoor.  This is the first router that I couldn't at least set up a FEW of them.  Any suggestions?  (Other than changing companies!)
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KY6LA - Howard, Elmer

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What's the model number?
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KY6LA - Howard, Elmer

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BTW... I have cable Internet.. so I was able to by my own DOCSIS 3.0 modem - much cheaper than renting it from Time Warner (8 month Payback) then I installed my own routers
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Ken - NM9P, Elmer

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it is at home and I am at the office.  I'll get back to you . . .  (;>)
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Bob G W1GLV

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I think the correct nomenclature is a reserved address which you setup in your router.
A static IP is used for WAN access.
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K1UO - Larry

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OK.....  Thanks guys for the confirmation.  Under my Router LAN tab and then the DHCP SERVER Tab the only listing I show is now the Ethernet Adapter connection on the radio so I guess that's a good thing.  I do have 4 router clients running beside the Wireless Ethernet Adapter (Radio).  So we shall see how it goes.  The only trouble I am chasing now is why the DAX channel sometimes starts "motorboating" on me.

Regards

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chaand farish

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You can't set your static ip by your own . It can be assigned by your ISP . after getting ip, you can check it by using  Ip-details.com
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Guy G4DWV/4X1LT

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You can set a static IP address within one's own network and this is what this thread is about. It is NOT about getting a static IP address for your internet connection from your IP.
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Max, I8NHJ/N5NHJ

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Sorry to be picky but for the sake of the truth you guys are not assigning a static IP address (that must be done on the interface) but telling the DHCP to assign the same IP address any time that MAC requires one.


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Tim - W4TME, Customer Experience Manager

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You are correct. Technically it is an IP address reservation
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K1ESE

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Tim -

Lately (after installing a new antivirus, coincidence?) every time I boot up the Flex gets a new IP address.  That is fine with SmartSDR and programs like N4PY, but DXLab Commander can't find the Flex.  

Each time I need to go to the SmartSDR SETTINGS > RADIO SETUP > RADIO menu and tab to see the new IP address.  I then have to change the Commander configuration to show the new address.

I am using a Flex 6500, SmartSDR 1.6.2.1.  The Flex Ethernet cable is connected directly to the port on the back of the computer and not through the router.  

How would I assign an IP address reservation?

Thanks,
John K1ESE
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Tim - W4TME, Customer Experience Manager

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Directly connected configuration between the PC and the radio is not actually using DHCP because there is no server to send IP address allocations; therefore, there is no way to create a reservation.  What you are actually using is an APIPA IP address which is a fall-back mechanism when no DHCP server is available.

It sounds like DXLab Commander is is not utilizing the established radio discovery protocol which would tell it the actual IP address of the radio.  This would eliminate the constant reconfigurations.
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N5LB - Lionel B

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Being the only person in the known universe who wasn't sure what "gateway" address to assign to the radio static IP address.  Of course it's the IP of the ethernet adapter in my direct radio to computer connection. 

Section 31.5 of the V1.10.8 software manual does provide the correct procedure but "gateway" is, I suppose, as obvious to networking as ohms law is to electronics. 

Anyway, static IP is assigned, DXlab Commander is happy knowing the IP will not change.  When the radio is set up for DHCP, DXLab cannot find the radio on the network-discovery protocol maybe isn't working on the DXLab side. 

Searching for "gateway" in the community didn't return what I was hoping to find - reference my entire known universe -  a 'duh" for me but maybe helpful for someone else. 
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Mark - WS7M

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So I guess I'm curious... Can I using SmartSDR assign my 6300 a static IP address? I know I can do this in Windows, Mac, printers, etc and I 've done so but for the life of me I cannot see how I set a static IP for my 6300?

I guess I could go into my router and make a reservation between the Mac address and my desired IP but I'm used to doing this in the device itself. Am I missing something?
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KY6LA - Howard, Elmer

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You need to go into your router and make a reservation using the radio MAC address... there is currently no way to set a fixed IP inside the radio.
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Peter K1PGV, Elmer

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There really SHOULD be a way to assign the radio a static IP using the controls on the front panel. Not everyone wants to or needs to operate a DHCP sever. I guess it's just a matter of priorities.

Peter
K1PGV
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Guy G4DWV/4X1LT

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Hi Peter,

>>Not everyone wants to or needs to operate a DHCP sever<<

But I'd wager that most people are running one even though they do not realise it so knowing how to set a fixed IP using one's own DHCP server is a very useful thing to know.
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Peter K1PGV, Elmer

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Well, sure. Knowledge of anything, on its face, is a good thing.  Who can argue that?

It's a small thing but it would be nice... OTOH, I can easily see how this can get triaged out during development.  It SOUNDs easier than it is.  Nobody REALLY wants to write the code to make the buttons on the front panel do the "up/down/left/right"... and then validate the entered elements one at a time, validate the ultimate entered address, display a message on the front panel if an invalid address gets entered, and somehow flag that the IP address is invalid on entry or once used on the network (wrong network, IP in use, etc etc)...

And don't forget once you can use a static IP for the radio, then you'll need to be able to enter static IP addresses for default gateway, DNS server, and the like.  It's not a Friday afternoon coding job.

So, while it would be nice, I can totally see how this wouldn't get done.  Give it to the intern, I say ;-)

Peter
K1PGV
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Larry da Ponte

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Agree. During JOTA we had no network and link local would not work for some reason, had to call for a router just to get the radio and laptop talking. I also noticed that the radio does not seem to get an ip from the dhcp server unless it's during a boot up. At least displaying the ip on the front panel would be helpful.
(Edited)
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Walt - KZ1F

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My router is, and always has been, the dhcp server. The 6500 and my main servers, and cloud nodes, all have reserved IP addresses.

I lock down wireless access through mac level access control.
(Edited)
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Mark - WS7M

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Well as a software engineer I do realize that writing code at the firmware level to do different things with limited buttons is not trivial.  Personally I would not go that route anyway because remember that the signature series has the 6300 with no front buttons.

I have many a small device from serial IP servers, to small network monitors etc that all come from the factory in DHCP mode.  Once connected to there is a web page usually where you can reconfigure the device.  On this page you can usually toggle it from DHCP mode to static and enter the address.  Once done you usually apply the results and restart the device and there it will remain.

I'm still looking but my comcast business gateway does not seem to have a place to make a reservation from mac to IP and it seems that one other fellow in this thread mentioned issues operating remote where a phone call needed to be made to modify the DHCP server to allow the radio in.

It seems to me this is a limitation of the scheme right now.  If I consider the possible modes of operation:

1) Home where you have some router you control that can give out DHCP.  This seems generally ok.  In my case my router gave the radio an IP and the software was able to find it.

2) Alternate location - If you have control great, if not then you have to ask for help.  May not be a huge issue but puts one more step in the process potentially.

3) Portable - I see two possibilities here: Either you bring a small port with a DHCP server inside of it, or you have to install one in Windows.  As mentioned above Windows DHCP servers don't always work well.  This is where I see the static IP being very helpful.  Get yourself a crossover cable, assuming you've set your laptop and radio on the same subnet with different IPs it would just work.  No router required.

I personally would vote for a future update that provided a webpage on the radio for the sole purpose of connecting, setting IP mode and values.  This would work on all of the signature series.
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Walt - KZ1F

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Mark, if you were referring to what I has said, I have a netgear AC 1750 wireless router after the provider supplied gateway which allows for both reserved IP addresses by Mac and Mac level access control for wireless devices, encrypted via wpa2.
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Mark - WS7M

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Hi Walt,

Of course I can do that but it is just one extra thing in the path.  My router (comcast provided) has a good, functional DHCP server in it.  But they don't allow the mapping of Mac to IP.  So your suggestion would definitely work but I guess it just seems to me that the radio should support setting a static IP within it for the third reason I stated of using a cross over cable to a laptop for portable use.
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Walt - KZ1F

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Fair enough, my experience with Comcast gateways is...well...less positive. I appreciate your response, tnx Mark.
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Mark - WS7M

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Hey Walt, don't get me wrong!  I don't *like* this gateway but it is all they have for this account level.  The thing is about as basic as it gets!

I had a sonicwall firewall behind it which would have allowed everything we are talking about however it for whatever reason and sonic could not fix it would cause my company VPN to go dead about every 20 minutes and require a reconnect. 

The moment I pulled the firewall out everything on the VPN side of things is fantastic.  It's another reason why I don't want to insert another box but probably anything else would be fine.
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KY6LA - Howard, Elmer

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@3 already works for Portable operations

You do NOT need a crossover cable to directly connect a laptop to a 6000 series radio.  If you are not using a router, you can directly connect the radio to the laptop and it will obtain a non routable local IP on the same subnet as your laptop.  

Obviously not as sexy as a Static IP but it works..
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Mark - WS7M

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Hi Howard.  Good to know.  Some devices won't do that if they are set for DHCP only.  But ok... now I'll have to give it a try that way.