Network Connection - Finally...

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I have been fighting connection problems for a month. I have found the problem. Perhaps this will help others who experience network/ connection issues.

When starting SSDR, I was (most of the time) getting "no reponse" when trying to connect to my 6300. My computer and 6300 were connected through my ASUS gigabit switch (which has been working with my computer just fine - connecting to the internet).

I tried re-setting the 6300, re-starting everything several times, new ethernet cables, re-installing SSDR, connecting directly to the computer, tried another computer - still, "no response" most of the time. Sometimes it would work.

I decided to connect the 6300 directly to my router (4 port gigabit switch built-in there) - bingo! Worked every time.

So, I deduced that all I really did was circumnavigate the ASUS gigabit switch. I decided to invest in a new (D-Link, this time) gigabit switch. Problem solved. The 5 year old ASUS switch apparently is defective - although, it works connecting to the internet.

Bottom line, try connecting directly to your router to shorten your network/connection troubleshooting time...

My .02

Alan
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Alan W4FBI

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Posted 4 years ago

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Bill -VA3WTB

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What is a switch, is that the same as a hub, and what does it do?
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Robbie - KI4TTZ

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Basically, yes, but if memory serves, a hub splits the bandwidth across all ports, but a switch provides full bandwidth to each port (no sharing). So, switches are better. But I haven't done hardware networking for years, so my knowledge is probably a bit rusty.

The OP can clarify, but I'm guessing he had a switch to provide more ports than the usual 4 ports that come on a normal broadband wireless router.
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Robbie - KI4TTZ

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Good to know, thanks for posting your solution! I recently got a new Asus wireless router (AC68U) to replace my cisco 4200v2 and it works great! Also recently found out the firmware is open source. But, I wanted to be sure I was eliminating all possible latency so I picked up cheap usb ethernet adapter and connected the flex directly to my computer. The Flex doesn't use much bandwidth anyway, but figured I'd eliminate all possible bottlenecks. There wasn't much difference but I didn't run any extensive tests.
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Duane, AC5AA

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Interesting results, Alan.  The only question I'd ask is why it didn't work when you connected the 6300 directly to the computer if it was the ASUS router/switch/hub that was the problem?  Direct connection should have eliminated the ASUS entirely, right?   All of the rest makes sense.
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Alan W4FBI

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I think the reason it didn't work when connected to the computer, is that the computer was connected to that defective ASUS switch.
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Alan W4FBI

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Ethernet switch -  yes, you could call it a Hub, I guess. You can connect several internet devices (using ethernet cable/RJ-45 plugs).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_switch
(Edited)
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Bill -VA3WTB

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Ok, I thought so. Since the computer is hard wired to the hub,,or switch, there would be no lan connection left on the computer. the Flex connects to the hub as well right? I'm asking as I don't have a 6000 flex yet, I'm trying to get my head around all this,,sorry..
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Robbie - KI4TTZ

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Bill - What brand/model of router/hub do you have now, or is it just a broadband modem that connects you to your cable (?) internet provider?
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Bill -VA3WTB

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Yes it a broadband router from Rogers that connects to the net. I was just wondering how the Flex would connect to a computer that is already connect  with Lan?
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Robbie - KI4TTZ

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If you have an extra ethernet port on the box that connects to the internet, then it should "just work". The Flex will announce itself on your network once your router gives it an IP address, so your computer should have no problems seeing it. (of course with technology, sometimes things aren't quite that easy) :-)
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Bill -VA3WTB

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Thanks Robbie, I was on the right track then. I am still using me flex 3000 for the last 4 years. I have retirement coming up in a couple years, bet you know what is in my plans, lol and I'm getting ready for it.
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Jon - KF2E

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When a hub receives a data packet it retransmits it on every other port on the hub. This is much less efficient than a switch which retransmits it only on the port of it's destination. In this way switches prevent devices for seeing unnecessary traffic. Switches use devices hardware MAC address to be able to determine where the packet goes. So yes, switches are much more effecient. To be honest, I didn't think they were still making hubs.

If your still using a hub, a switch is a good cheap upgrade.

Jon...kf2e