Microsoft 'Confirms' Windows 10 Has Seriously Nasty Surprise

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I just came across this article regarding Windows 10 and thought I'd post it here since this is the OS most of us use to operate SmartSDR.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/gordonkelly/2017/07/27/microsoft-windows-10-upgrade-free-problems-specs...

I am beginning to loath Windows in general and have migrated most of my software over to Linux.  As much as I dislike Apple, I'm starting to think that it might be a better alternative than Windows at this point.

Am I the only one that feels the desire to bail off of Windows?

Norm - W7CK
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Norm - W7CK

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Posted 2 years ago

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Robbie - KI4TTZ

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People have complained about Windows since it came out.  Before Linux was mainstream, people wanted to move from Windows to OS/2.  Operating systems are just tools, they all have pros and cons.
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N4TTN

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Guess I am not reading that article. I refuse to turn off my ad blocker.
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Warren Gaspar

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One solution is to go back to Windows 7, supported until 2020. A lot fewer issues with fewer updates than Windows 10.
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VE7ATJ

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Hi Norm... sorry, but this really isn't "news".  Microsoft has been saying for years now, that not ALL hardware platforms would continue to be supported by Windows.  Here, they are only re-iterating that as the O/S evolves to take advantage of newer hardware platform capabilities, some devices will have to be left behind.

And, from my perspective, having been in the software development industry for over 45 years, this is just the nature of the beast.  There is simply no way to keep software completely backwards compatible for ever.  At some point, you have to move on from the old hardware devices that just don't have the firmware/capacity to handle the expectations people want from the O/S these days.  Especially when you consider the number of checks and balances now required in the O/S to protect us from malware, ransomware, etc. etc.

Yes, there have been numerous problems with the Creator's Update.  I myself was a 'victim' with brand new hardware, where it took 3rd party techies three tries to finally get the patched version installed and stable.  Does MS screw up?  Sure they do... and frequently...  but Windows is still a good, stable, and very usable O/S.

I'm glad you are comfortable with Linux.  Myself, I'm not comfortable with it as an end-user O/S.  It works great for servers, etc. but that's a whole different level of 'techie'.
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G8ZPX

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Norm what would you do, ask Microsoft to rewrite all drivers and apps for every piece of obsolete, incompatible or just plain crappy designs of hardware?   Windows is already trying to be all-thing to all men and that is why its so complicated to support. Drop some of the carryover (legacy) compatibility problems and things suddenly become more stable.

One day not so far from now Flex will be faced with the same issues, new features needing new hardware, so what would we do stick or twist?

(Edited)
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Varistor

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This is not a news article per se and has nothing to do with Forbes. This is an article that has one and only one goal in mind- eyeballs in order to generate ad revenue. People are consistently attracted to controversy and bad news and this article monetizes this kind of behavior.
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N4TTN

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Which is one reason I don't read "articles" the require not using an ad blocker.
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KC9NRN

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Ahhh OS/2 Warp, I had to roll that out for a bank in the suburbs of Chicago back in 1995! Apple has issues I'd rather not get into right now, besides Flex is on Windows primarily.

Microsoft has been going the wrong direction with Windows for a while now but at least it's stable (depending on who built it of course). I use Windows 10 because I have to support it so I have one on the Insider Fast track and the rest on the path Windows 10 Updates provides but I also turn off all the tracking crap.

The crux of the matter:

“If a hardware partner stops supporting a given device or one of its key components and stops providing driver updates, firmware updates, or fixes, it may mean that device will not be able to properly run a future Windows 10 feature update.”

And the result of a device or component no longer being supported is severe. When updating users will simply receive the message: “Windows 10 is no longer supported on this PC”.

And to make matters worse, at present Windows 10 will not tell users which piece of hardware is responsible for the cancellation. A user will have to check every part of their PC, from the processor and RAM to the hard drive, graphics and network card.

This brutal (and frankly over generalized) decision follows in the wake of Microsoft blocking Windows 10 Creators Update upgrades for computers using older Intel Atom ‘Clover Trail’ processors without warning or explanation. Conversely it also said new Intel Kaby Lake and AMD Ryzen silicon will also be made incompatible with older versions of Windows to force them onto Windows 10.

The case of the former is particularly troubling as having infamously pushed users to upgrade to Windows 10, these Clover Trail PCs were then cut off from getting new features just two years later. And with each new Windows 10 upgrade more hardware will be sidelined - as it stands - without any warning. It’s a very nasty situation.

No doubt many Windows 10 upgraders would have been scared away had these rules been made clear at the time, but Microsoft did offer one olive branch: it will continue to provide cut-off Windows 10 PCs with security updates until January 2023. This is 2.5 years before the end of the official support (October 14th 2025), but it’s something.

Ultimately I think this is a cheap trick from Microsoft. Never before did old versions of Windows exclude PCs from upgrades if they were deemed powerful enough to run that version of Windows at launch. "

In the end you decide, Windows 8.1 with the 3rd party Start Menu was a great OS, I may return to it if Microsoft continues on this path. But then Microsoft could easily add the same code to previous Windows installations forcing the same things.

Linux is looking better and better for the main PC, time to do some testing on some newer distro's to see how far it has come. Ubuntu or... hmmmmmmm

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KC9NRN

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I need to edit this "Microsoft has been going the wrong direction with Windows for a while now but at least it's stable (depending on who built it of course)."

I meant depending on who built the computer. :)

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Norm - W7CK

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I reread the article and for some reason during my first read through I thought Windows 10 would just stop working if the hardware was no longer supported by its manufacturer.  Now I realize, that is not the case and only future updates would be withheld.  Understandable.  Too bad the update process doesn't tell you which piece of hardware it is having issues with.

I have an old Dell XPS laptop that has a fingerprint reader and a card reader that are not supported by Windows 10.  I don't use those two items and have disabled them.  Windows still sees them at times and complains.  Even so, I've still gotten all of the updates so far and things run ok.   I've seen laptops that are less than a year old that have trouble with hardware support under windows 10.  In the long run though I'm sure it will be a giant boost in computer sales!

Anyway, I'm just passing on what I read.
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KF4HR

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I plan to use Windows 7 as long as possible.  No issues with 7 other than SDR CAT problems.
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Tim - W4TME, Customer Experience Manager

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