Lost connectivity with radio.

  • 1
  • Problem
  • Updated 7 months ago
  • (Edited)
 Working a QSO and all of a sudden the radio lost connection with the network. The radio is connected directly to the router. The computer that runs SSDR is connected via a switch. After this happened I ping the radio and got good resultss for 34 pings, this tells me the radio is connected via the network. Then I restarted the radio, still no connection. After rebooting the computer everything was ok. The computer I'm using is a NUC. Using SSDR 2.0.19. Running Win10 on the NUC.
Photo of Bob G   W1GLV

Bob G W1GLV

  • 632 Posts
  • 106 Reply Likes

Posted 7 months ago

  • 1
Photo of David

David

  • 281 Posts
  • 48 Reply Likes
If you can provide more details it will help.

- Make and model of Router, switch, and NUC
- Specs on NUC CPU, RAM, ethernet
- What else was running on the NUC
- What was/is the CPU and RAM usage level
- What other devices and their activity that are connected to the Router and Switch

Can you connect the NUC to the router temporarily to remove the switch from the equation? I discovered I had a bad managed switch that was causing issues.
Photo of Bob G   W1GLV

Bob G W1GLV

  • 632 Posts
  • 105 Reply Likes
I will connect the NUC to the router directly and I'll report back.
Photo of David

David

  • 38 Posts
  • 8 Reply Likes
I wonder if the lease time of the IP address expired...It is usually 1440 minutes (24 hours)   Could it have renewed it's IP address and lost connection briefly?
Photo of Bob G   W1GLV

Bob G W1GLV

  • 632 Posts
  • 105 Reply Likes
The radio and the NUC are static IP's.
Photo of Tim - W4TME

Tim - W4TME, Customer Experience Manager

  • 8670 Posts
  • 3251 Reply Likes
Losing a lease is very unlikely if the radio is connected and communicating with the network.
Photo of David

David

  • 38 Posts
  • 8 Reply Likes
Are you saying that if the lease time expires while connected it will reset by itself without loosing connection? (I am just trying to learn how it works)
Photo of David

David

  • 281 Posts
  • 48 Reply Likes
Typically if the IP is active the lease shouldn't expire. It should just renew. It can depend on the device and how it has implemented DHCP. A google search will turn up results where people were expiring drops on expire in general use not specific to Flex.
Photo of Tim - W4TME

Tim - W4TME, Customer Experience Manager

  • 8670 Posts
  • 3251 Reply Likes
To add a little more detail to David's explanation, at the point where a lease has hit 50% of its lease duration, the host (PC or radio), if operating properly, will request a DHCP lease.  All DHCP servers on the network will respond to this request.  The host will decide which DHCP OFFER to accept and if the DHCP server that provided the previous IP address leases responds, the host will accept that one which effectively becomes a lease "renewal" and the cycle continues until the new lease duration time hits 50% of its duration.

If the DHCP server is not available on the network to respond to the host's DHCP lease request (DHCP DISCOVERY), the host will continue to send a request for a DHCP renewal at various intervals, waiting for any DHCP server to respond.  If there are no DHCP servers to answer a lease request and the lease expires, the host will have it's IP address lease revoked.  What happens next is OS dependent, but in general the host should self-assign a link-local (APIPA) IP address to the interface.

If the host is shut down during an active lease time period, when it is rebooted, it will request a DHCP lease.  If the lease on the DHCP server has not fully expired, the host will get the same IP address it had previously.  Some DHCP servers will cache expired leases so that if the host reconnects after the lease expiration time, it will get a lease that has the same IP address as it had previously, maintaining IP address continuity (but guaranteeing it).

DHCP is a robust protocol.  I have set up enterprise DHCP processes that serviced 10,000+ hosts on a single enterprise network and it just works reliably unless there is a server or network communication failure.
Photo of Mark - WS7M

Mark - WS7M

  • 953 Posts
  • 331 Reply Likes
I have noticed with 2.x that even on my lan, if I'm wireless via laptop to the network sometimes I just get disconnected.  Re-start of my computer and SSDR brings it back.

My wired computer next to the radio is rock solid.  Could be wifi stuff in my case.
Photo of WX7Y

WX7Y

  • 446 Posts
  • 78 Reply Likes
Mine did this today as well, turn out to be the stupid AVAST firewall changed my home network From "Private" to "Public" and killed SmartSDR, DAX and CAT.
Wasted about an hour checking out everything until it dawned on me the dam firewall changed states.

73's
Bret
WX7Y
Photo of David

David

  • 38 Posts
  • 8 Reply Likes
I would like to point out that many Microwave ovens operate at 2.4 GHz range and when they are leaky they knock out WiFi over a wide area.  I have had this investigated and proven on several occasions at hotels where The WiFi is on 2.4 GHz.   I just wanted to mention this in case it it relevant tho those who are loosing WiFi connections    I use the WiFi analyser from "Rig Expert" to detect and resolve this..... Just changing to 5 GHz (On both ends) and seeing if the problem goes away can help in the search...
Photo of Stan - VA7NF

Stan - VA7NF

  • 391 Posts
  • 82 Reply Likes
And how easily we forget about USB 3.  See the following white paper by Intel.
https://www.intel.ca/content/www/ca/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.htm
Just having a USB 3 dongle or poor cable can wipe out a wireless keyboard, so why not a wireless "wireless" radio.