IPv6 support

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Will any of the Flex radios support IPv6 in the future? Not really that big of a deal, but Apple now has requirements that any apps submitted to the app store must be able to function in an IPv6 only environment.

This is more out of curiosity as a tech/networking/dev person. 
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Ria - N2RJ, Elmer

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Posted 2 years ago

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Tim - W4TME, Customer Experience Manager

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Can we support IPv6?  Yes.

Will we support it in the future? TBD.  If there is a valid use case that meets the 80/20 rule, then we will seriously consider supporting it in the future.
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Peter K1PGV, Elmer

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The vast majority of nodes on the Internet don't support IP V6 and have no plans to do so. Internally, within an enterprise, there's almost no reason to even consider supporting IP V6 ever. And, on a home network"where the vast majority of Flex systems are used, I can think of nothing but disadvantages to using IP V6.

To me, the most important thimg about IP V6 is remembering to disable it on the systems I install.

Is there an IP V6 specific feature that youre hoping for? You know... Just curious as another tech/networking/dev person.

Peter
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Ria - N2RJ, Elmer

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As for specific features, having a routable IP address would be the major one. SLAAC instead of DHCP is another.
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Peter K1PGV, Elmer

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Hi Ria,

Thanks for the reply. I think you made my point for me. You're running a "very high traffic" site and just enabled dual stack this week.

Having IP V4 only support does not preclude having a routanle address, as you well know. And SLAAC is cool... As long as you have a /64 address block available. Again, useful on your home network? Not so much.

As far as what Apple requires, well, they require lots of things. There aren't many internet sites hosted on Apple computers.

I asked because I consider IP V6 nothing but an iannoyance when it comes to internet connectivity, and pointless for an internal network. So I was curious about your query. Again, thanks for the reply.

Peter
K1PGV
(Edited)
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Ria - N2RJ, Elmer

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Actually, yes, it kind of does since v4 addresses have (past tense) run out.  Getting a block of v4 routable addresses for a home or small office network costs money and will be impossible in the near future. Getting a /64 on IPv6 is free, essentially since it is the minimum standard configuration for an IPv6 network (if you are allocated less than a /64, some thinge like neighbor discovery will break). A /48 should be no problem either. I have a /48 block for my home use since I run multiple subnets. 

The Apple requirements are significant because as it is now, you cannot get an app approved without support for IPv6 only networking (it was announced at WWDC 2015). Apple is going further by requiring that the backend for the apps also support IPv6. Apple clearly has seen the future here and wants its ecosystem ready for it. 

So you have half of the mobile device world mandating IPv6 compatibility. And actually, with the level of abstraction that iOS provides (NSURLSession and CFNetwork APIs) it is transparent to the end user. 

IPv6 is going to matter even more because the IoT is expanding even more. Flex radios are very much part of IoT. It's not a high priority item for them but it would be a nice to have to stay ahead if there is some spare bandwidth, development wise. 

"I consider IP V6 nothing but an iannoyance when it comes to internet connectivity, and pointless for an internal network."

Deployed properly it actually works better on internal networks. Internet connectivity will soon have a native IPv6 stack enabled by the ISP by default.  Wireless carriers have already done so and wired carriers are not far behind. DOCSIS3 has it already and other last miles like VDSL and FTTx technologies do as well. 

Usage is only climbing, as IPv6 usage has gone from almost zero to almost 15% of end users in the past 3 years alone. 

On a side note, much of the annoyance of current IPv6 implementations on the desk side has to do with bridge technologies like Teredo and 6to4. Once those are replaced with native dual stack, that will be much less of a concern, and of course transparent to the end user. 
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KC9NRN

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I disable it at work and at home, if and when it becomes the standard and IPv4 is no longer being used I'll change. It provides nothing of benefit to me at all right now. I do plan on taking classes this winter to become better qualified to use it should I ever need to but for now, too busy.
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Peter K1PGV, Elmer

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Hi Ria,

We're going to have to agree to disagree on much of the issues around IP V6 , it seems. People have been trumpetting that IP V6 is around the corner for more than a decade. It just ain't happening anytime soon. Having the capability to support IP V6 is a very long way from actually supporting IP V6 in a practical sense in a connected world.

We've been "running out of IP addresses" for more than 20 years, and while all the IP blocks have now been allocated at a macro level, have you ever heard of anyone putting up a new site and not being able to get a routable IP V4 address? Of course not. Yes... it's harder to get big blocks of IP V4 addresses... When my company changed ISPs, we had to turn in our C-block (from which we had used only a small number of addresses) for a much smaller CIDR block. I argued, but in the end, I really don't need 255 routable IP V4 addresses. I just wanted my own C-Block because we always had our own C-Block. In reality, 64 routable addresses (which is what we were given) is more than enough. Everything else is behind the firewalls in any case. Heck... Even much of the publicly accessible stuff behind the firewalls gets NATed according to destination service.

The fact is that most iP nodes don't have to be directly internet connectable.

Your point about IoT is an interesting one. But again, how many of those devices will be directly connected, versus connected through some sort of gateway? Don't you envision a lot of mesh-connected nodes behind gateways? Consider Alljoyn... Not everything is a router, right?

"Deployed properly it actually works better on internal networks."

Works better? I just don't see it. I don't want my internal network directly routable, and IPSEC is IPSEC. Having a bigger address space on my internal Corp net adds no value that I can see.

So, like I said, I think we have to agree to disagree. Thanks for taking the time to discuss the issue with me. It's good to hear and consider different viewpoints. Most of us tend to associate with folks with similar views, due to the communities we work in. So hearing a different view is useful.

Peter
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Winston VK7WH

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Peter, you may be able to give me some guidance, as I have very limited knowledge on the subject of IPv6, other than it provides better security and a vastly increased number of IP addresses.

I have my 6700 located at a remote solar powered site, currently controlled using Parallels Access from an iPad, however I plan to setup a VPN in the near future. Because the remote site does not have a static IP address or even a public IP address, with no likelihood of ever getting one, I plan to run the VPN server at my home shack.

For some time I have had a static IP address at my home qth ADSL connection, however when I recently changed over to a fibre FTTN connection I ran "checkmyipaddress" and found that I now have a very long alpha numerical IP address more than 20 characters long.

1) Is this an IPv6 address?
2) Will it present any problems setting up a Softether VPN Server?
3) Should I seek to have it changed back to a static IPv6 address?
4) Is there any workaround if my Service Provided won't or can't change it back

Thanks Peter, or anyone else who may be able to put me on the "straight and narrow path"

73

Winston
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Ria - N2RJ, Elmer

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You likely do have an IPv6 address, and since you went with a fiber connection it is even more likely.

But you also have an IPv4 address and are running something called a "dual stack" configuration which means your system can use both v4 and v6 addressing schemes. 

No ISP is exclusively on IPv6 and won't be for a while. 

Go to http://www.test-ipv6.com.  It will show both stacks and your IP address on each as well as confirming connectivity. 

So it shouldn't really matter for SoftEther, OpenVPN or any such thing. Carry on as usual. 
(Edited)
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Winston VK7WH

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Many thanks Ria. Yes, I found your earlier post and link and , as you say, I do have both. Once I have my VPN up and running and tested on both, maybe I can cancel the fixed IPv4 address and save the $10 per month I currently paying
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Winston VK7WH

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Correction. It should read
3) Should I seek to have it changed back to a static IPv4 address
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Winston VK7WH

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Peter, I think I have found the answer to my questions.

I just ran test-IPv6 and see that I do in fact still have an IPv4 address, although it has changed. That is not a problem as long as it keeps the new address.
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Peter K1PGV, Elmer

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Hi Winston,

Yes, it sounds like an IP V6 address)assuming by "alphanumeric" you mean the digits 0 through 9 and the letters a through f only. That's actually 8 groups of numbers expressed in hexadecimal notation (each group,separated by a colon) like: A123:4566:7DE3:8476:... (Etecetera).

I'm sorry to say I know exactly nothing about SoftEther, so I can't provide any help.

I think Ria N2RJ (the OP) might be better able to answer your queries than I can.

Peter
K1PGV
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Winston VK7WH

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Thanks Peter. It looks like I have both IP v6 and IPv4 addresses. I didn't pick this up until I saw Ria's link. Thanks Ria

Winston