How close do you need to be to a desk mike?

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I am thinking of getting one of the new Inrad desk microphones, but I am wondering if having it mounted on the desk would mean I need to lean forward or pick it up to use it, or will I be able to adjust it to pick up my voice from a sitting position?  Perhaps rather than getting the desktop stand, I would be better off getting a boom?   I have only used handheld mikes or a headset so any advice would be greatly appreciated.  
Thanks and 73,
Bob, WK2Y
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Bob Gerzoff, WK2Y

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Posted 5 months ago

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Rick Hadley - W0FG

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I have an Inrad 629 on the DMS1 PTT stand.  With compression set in the DX position and at 50% mic gain I need to lean into it, but at close to 100% I can sit back and still drive the amp to 1kw.  I have a fairly bass-heavy voice, if that give you any general idea.  I'm very satisified with the Inrad.
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Bill English

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I have always used a boom with mine and adjusted it for close talking. It would seem to me that with the gain set high enough to allow you to talk from a sitting position to a desk mic the rig would get a lot of ambient noise such as fans and XYL's and the dog barking (at least at my house anyway)....

I recently found a fairly decent boom on Amazon for 27 bucks, and it actually works. I have a PR-20 in it and I have used it for a few weeks with no problems. It comes with a shock mount, a pop-filter, even a holder for a cell phone if you want to video yourself working DX.  Now it's not the best made by any means, but with normal use, I don't see mine falling apart any time soon. I am happy with it. I took the phone holder off and let my kids use it as a selfie stick.

Here is a link to it.

https://www.amazon.com/AOREAL-Microphone-Adjustable-Professional-Replaceable/dp/B01N641NTA/ref=sr_1_...

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Bill -VA3WTB

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In order to get the best S/N ratio it is important to get nice and tight to the mic. This will produce the best sound and keep any possible room noise to a whisper.
If you see any radio host on air we see them up close. Look at the way the mics are used on Ham Nation as example. Or any type of broadcasting.
A boom is a good choice.
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Scott Russell - N1SER

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I'm kind of a mic snob... but in a good way :) That being said, get a boom and get the mic as close to you as you can. You don't need to be touching it with your lips but at least a few inches away as long as it has good pop filter characteristics. I don't know much about the Inrad mics, are they condenser or dynamic? That makes a difference as well. Condenser mics are more sensitive and usually require some phantom power compared to dynamic which don't. Condenser mics will also pickup a lot of room noise if you have them too far away from your mouth. That's why you need to be close. Dynamics are not as sensitive but good practice is to be close. The Rode PSA1 boom is a nice piece of hardware and is just as good as a Heil but costs less.
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Bob Gerzoff, WK2Y

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They are dynamic:

The INRAD 629 microphone is a wide frequency range, unidirectional cardioid dynamic microphone ideally suited for rag chewing and ESSB. It features a large 1.125" diaphragm and an internal rubber element suspension system for reducing undesirable noise. Excellent 180 degree rear rejection cardioid response. Excellent articulation across the specified frequency response with a rise in response to match the voice characteristics of speech. Output tailored to rise from 500 Hz, crossing 1 kHz up to 4 kHz, exaggerating the microphone output frequency response of these vocal frequencies. The result is clear, an overall well-articulated audio response tailored to match intelligibility of human voice.

INRAD DMS-629 Represents a revolution in price versus performance for Amateur Radio microphones. Highly unidirectional cardioid dynamic microphone features a large 1.125" diaphragm for clear, full audio response. This mic features excellent articulation with a rise in response to match the characteristics of speech for superior voice intelligibility. INRAD's top of the line microphone.


The M650 microphone is the M Series counterpart to the M629 that provides well articulated overall audio with overall higher-end output punch for contesting and DX operation. Featuring a unique cardioid dynamic element with a response pattern similar to the M629, the M650 incorporates an abrupt frequency response change above 1 kHz to 2 kHz then has a flat response to 4 kHz. Lower frequencies are somewhat diminished relative in output to the higher ones, giving the sound more high-end punch with a slightly less low-end response; a top-of-the-line dynamic mic with less low-end response than the M629.



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Scott Russell - N1SER

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Ok, very good Bob. So which one are you considering? Also, which radio do you have?
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Bob Gerzoff, WK2Y

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I'm probably going to go with 629.  I love dx, rag chewing, etc so I figure that one will give me a little more flexibility.  I don't really need the punch for dx.  I have a 6500.
Definitely sounds like I would prefer a boom rather than the desk stand.  I'd have to be leaning forward all the time it would seem
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Mike - VE3CKO, Elmer

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I'll have to check out that microphones. Let the radio work for you instead of having a mic for rag chew and a mic for DX. I must again point to Ken NM9P's excellent tutorial:
A Tour of Profiles on the Flex 6000 Series
If I had a nickel for every time I've recommended this video, I'd be able to buy a box or two of popsicles.
(Edited)
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Bob Gerzoff, WK2Y

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Yes, I have heard that from several quarters.  If you have an equalizer such as the Flex all mikes (at least decent ones) are more or less equal.  You just have put the time into tailoring them for your voice.
Thanks.
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Mike - VE3CKO, Elmer

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I agree with Bill. For me a desk stand mic forced me to lean into the mic from a chair putting a lot of strain on my back. You do need to be a few inches away from the mic, having the gain too high will pick up all kinds of vibrations and noise. So leaning back in a chair is not an option. The mic boom with proper mount to absorb vibration has worked for me for decades when I did a Beatles internet radio show. Boom can be moved in optimum position for radio operation then easily lifted out of the way when not in use, no desk clutter.I went through a couple of cheap booms made of low grade whatever that easily bent or broke over short period. The Heil PL2T boom and the superior mounting options did cost a bit more but has given me no problems and well worth it. Looks way better as th cable gets hidden inside one of the frames. So really you can say that boom is better for shack RF as approximately 39" of mic cable is inside the metal frame.

(Edited)
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Clay N9IO

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Have never tried a balanced Mic yet however I have been looking at the Inrad mics when I ever do.
Currently have a Heil HB1 boom and a 1940 Astatic head I found ar a hamfest 35 years ago. The mic cartridge is an old Heil HC4 for the past 25 years. I close talk it and it performs very well.
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Bob KN4HH

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I have been using a new Inrad DMS-629 Desk Microphone with my Flex 6500 for a week now.  My current profile along with the Mike gain setting at 85, speaking about 2 inches away from the mike gives me full output.
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Neil N4FN

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I ordered the INRAD 629 from Scott before FLEX was handling them and found it to be very senstive so distance was not a real issue (of course not from across the room). It is a hot mic.
Neil   N4FN