High/Low Cut persistence ...

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  • Question
  • Updated 2 years ago
  • Answered
Scenario -

AM mode : set High Cut to 4000 hz.
Switch to USB/LSB mode : set High Cut to 3100 hz.
Return to AM mode and High Cut remains at 3100 hz.

Set High Cut to 4000 hz (AM)
Switch to USB/LSB mode
High Cut changes back to 3100 hz (expected)
Does not change to AM setting on mode change

USB/LSB retains High/Low Cut setting
AM mode does not
Returning to AM mode keeps USB/LSB setting when original AM setting is preferred

Recapitulation -

AM High/Low Cut settings do not persist per mode

Comments?

W7NGA  dan
San Juan Island, Wa.
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W7NGA

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Posted 2 years ago

  • 2
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Barry N1EU

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bug
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W7NGA

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I agree Barry ... there is no reason that my AM settings should not persist.
Sideband settings do ... AM discrimination!
(Edited)
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Gary Wise

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No. As I tell my students, Discriminators are for FM.

Detectors are for AM.

(Poor attempt at Ham humor)

73 Gary W4EEY
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W7NGA

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No worries Gary. I 'detected' a bit of humor there but wasn't 'phased' at all.
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Barry N1EU

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AMers can't get no respect, especially AMers using super hi tech state of the art equipment.  
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W7NGA

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Perhaps someone could verify what I am seeing to eliminate a configuration issue on my end.
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Burt Fisher

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It is so.
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Larry - W8LLL

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I thought I read in the manual that filter settings are saved in Global profiles.
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Gene - K3GC

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Tx filters are saved in Mic Profiles
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W7NGA

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Well, I've exhausted myself working through profile scenarios and I think I understand things better now. It gets convoluted, in that each mode can have a Mic profile and the associated profile gets loaded upon a state (mode) change. So, I can have a Mic profile for SSB and another for AM. If I change the High/Low Cut value in one mode it retains that value until I change modes and return, where the associated profile overwrites my settings. 

At least I think that is how it is working. Back to the manual.

My situation is that sometimes I will call CQ on AM and a SSB station answers me, forcing me to switch modes continuously. I think once one understands the nuts & bolts of profile assignments a quick solution is more easily found. In the heat of the moment, attempting to select another slice with the same frequency but different mode usually digs me in deeper so I resist the temptation!
(Edited)
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Ken - NM9P, Elmer

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The Mic profile saves Mic input source, Mic Gain, Mike +20 Preamp status, HI/Lo Cut, Processing status and level, TX EQ status and settings, VOX status and level, DEXP status and level, Mic Monitor status and level.  Once you have adjusted any of these parameters, you must save it to an existing or new Mic Profile for them to be "remembered."  

You can save a good number of different Mic profiles, because a profile you use on AM will not sound the best on SSB and vice versa.  You can even have multiple Mic profiles for each mode, depending upon your intended purpose - Rag Chewing, DX-ing, Weak Signal, ESSB, Annoying your neighbors, etc.

Once you have them edited and saved - each with its own name - the current persistence will remember the last profile you used on that particular mode and switch to it when you change modes.  Your AM Profile will be used when you switch to AM, your FM profile when you switch to FM, and your SSB profile when you switch to SSB (but it doesn't save USB and LSB separately...I wish it did, because I usually use my Rag Chew profile on 40/75/160 where I do most of my Rag-chewing, and my DX profile on the other bands that use USB)

Once you have activated a mode once and selected a corresponding Mic profile for that mode, the rig will remember it...until you change the profile while using that mode...then it remembers the last one you used.

But...if you change any of the parameters associated with an audio profile, they will not be remembered once you shift away from that Mic profile, either by manually changing to a different profile or by changing to a different mode that automatically changes to a different Mic profile.  If you want the changes to be remembered, you must save them to a new or existing Mic profile.

This keeps you from permanently messing up your favorite Mic profile while messing around.  You have to "commit" those changes to memory for them to stick.

Hope this helps.

Ken - NM9P
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W7NGA

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That's a great characterization Ken .. Thank you.
On AM I tend to change my transmitting bandwidth based on band conditions and congestion. Invariably, someone on SSB calls and when I bounce back to AM mode the 6500 reverts to the profile setting. No big deal ... understanding the inner-workings helps. I am just not much of a profile creator .. but I should probably take the time to create a few workable Mic profiles for different conditions.
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Ken - NM9P, Elmer

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Profiles are your friends!  Once you master them, you will wonder how you got along without them!  This is what puts the magic into SDR.  The FLEX-ability, power, and ease of adjusting various audio parameters to create necessary Mic Profiles is unparalleled. 

Another neat thing about playing with profiles is that as long as you do your experimenting with a "test" profile, you can't break anything.  It may sound bad, but you can change it or ease it and start over! no fear!

Have fun.

Ken - NM9P
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Tim - W4TME, Customer Experience Manager

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I have entered this problem report into our bug tracker (#3517) for additional investigation. Thank you for the defect report.