Great TX Audio!

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  • Updated 4 years ago

I’m still getting unsolicited “great audio” comments with my 6300 during rag-chew QSOs. It’s very satisfying for an old retired audio guy to have such a fine-sounding radio.

If anyone’s interested, here are my settings for SSB using a basic Heil Pro-Micro headset. These are for this mic and my voice, but might serve as a starting point for you...

+20dB gain selected

MIC level at 65

PROC on, Normal position

TX BW:  100 to 3000

DEXP ON (set at 30 for my mic & shack ambient noise)

EQ Settings: 

63   -10

125  -3

250  -1

500  +1

1K   +3

2K   +6

4K   +8

8K   -10

Note that the 63 and 8K Hz settings are all the way down. No reason to hit the processor with extraneous stuff so far outside the passband.
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Jim, KJ3P

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Posted 4 years ago

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Ken - NM9P, Elmer

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Fun, isn't it, Jim?
I also consistently get "great audio" reports.  These are great rigs.

But just for fun and education, last night I ran a test on my 6500 with my flex buddies on 40 SSB.  The theory was "you can't make these things sound bad."  I said "I bet I can."  So I had one of the guys record me on his 3000 as I proceeded to turn my mike gain up from my standard 37, in stages of 10, all the way to 100.  When he played it back, the results were as I expected.  
Once I got about 10-15 units past my normal setting, the audio started to get pretty rough.  And it very quickly started to sound quite nasty. (some of the guys had a different adjective.)  
The amazing thing was that as bad as it sounded, it never got very "wide."  But my comment was "I'd be ashamed to put that signal on the air."  And all on the frequency agreed.

The bottom line is... and my advice to the group....Use the mike line level meter and adjust it properly.... adjust it with the processor OFF so that you never peak past the "0 dB" line and it turns red.  Then turn the processor ON and leave the mike level ALONE.  Turning it up past 0 dB in order to bring your average power level up is counter productive.  That is what the processor is for.  Once it has done all it can, any other improvement in talk power needs to be done by judicious adjustment of the TX EQ, followed by readjusting the mike level to keep the total mike input under the 0 dB level.  

It should be really simple, actually, but many people I hear on the air have WAY too much bass, or WAY too much treble, or too much scooped out in the middle.  A few minutes work and these rigs are stellar performers!
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Jim, KJ3P

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So are so right on all counts...I should have included the procedure as well as the settings.
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Ken - NM9P, Elmer

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I love it when I call someone and they say, "You must be running a FLEX!  I can tell by your great audio."
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Bill -VA3WTB

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Ken it was interesting, I was on last night with you and Bill. I wish you were stronger so I would have recorded you also. What I like to do some times is turn my scope on and watch the audio on my Flex 3000. Compared to most standard radios the Flex audio is very clean on the scope. I was nice talking to you Ken, It just dawned on me who you are from this post.
Bill VA3WTB, Ontario Canada.
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Ken - NM9P, Elmer

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Ha!  I hadn't put two and two together either, because I don't usually see your call with your name!  I have met so many people in my job that if I meet them in a location/situation that is different from the usual, I often won't recognize them until I make a connection and the lightbulb turns on.  I guess age has made me a "dim bulb!"  hi hi.