Go from 5000A to 6500 What features do I lose

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  • Updated 3 years ago
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I have a 5000A with ATU and RX2, latest version of PowerSDR. I use a Pixel loop on RX2 for receiving. 


What, if any, features do I lose by switching to a 6500. Not interested in what I'll gain, I pretty much know that. But with the current software for the 6500 are there features that aren't there yet?

I am particularly interested in TNF and narrow filters for CW and CW performance.

Thanks,

Pete W6OP

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Pete - W6OP

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Posted 3 years ago

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k0eoo

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Hi Pete, I have a 6500 now but I had the 5000A w/RX2 and ATU, and, as far as I can tell TNF and CW filters are as good if not better than with the 5000A.  I'm mainly a CW/RTTY op and really enjoy my 6500...

Dennis, k0eoo
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Pete - W6OP

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Thanks! That is what I wanted to hear. With the slow evolution of the software I haven't kept up with all the updated features. 
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k0eoo

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Like any other subjective evaluation, YMMV....
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Walt - KZ1F

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Are you interested in nr, NB, and wnb behavior?
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Ken - NM9P, Elmer

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The only thing I can think of is that some 5000 users report that their NB is more effective on certain types of impulse noise.  But the 6000 has the WNB which eliminates the noise from the whole panadapter.  (for the noise types that it is effective at reducing.)  The ANF still needs some tweaks, but I use the TNF filters most of the time, because they are more flexible and more effective, except for the "swishers" or drifting carriers.  But with the excellent pan, I can just zoom in, grab the tnf marker and drag it where I need it.

The NR might be able to be tweaked a bit, but I find that it was about as effective as the NR on my 1500 was.  You must carefully adjust it, though, and after adjustment, you might need to tweak the AGC-T setting a tad....I find it very helpful when using narrow filters on CW.  With wider filters, it doesn't seem to be quite as effective.  But I almost always use 50 Hz and 250 is "Wide" for me anymore....

If your 5000A has the second receiver, then you will lose the ability to do dual antenna diversity by using the 2nd receiver on a different antenna.  The 6500 only has a single SCU (Receiver unit) even though you can listen to 4 slices at the same time,  all four must use the same antenna.

But overall the 6500 is much higher performance on SSB, CW, RTTY and many other modes.  There is less latency on CW, and I find it an excellent CW rig.  Some of the real high power CW ops may differ, but I find that the brick-wall filters are unbeatable.

The panadapter is far superior to the 5000A in speed, zoom, and detail.  it is easy to separate signals 25 Hz apart!

The new RTTY mode is wonderful and easy to set up with MMTTY (my RTTY program of choice at the moment) 

So I guess another thing you lose is all the hassle of messing with VAC and com0com or VSPManager, and all of the other third party access tools that you needed to use to set up digital connections...

my nickel's worth...YMMV.

Ken - NM9P
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Burch - K4QXX

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As others have said, the NB is much better on the 5000A for the type of noise at my QTH, However, I much prefer using my 6500 over the 5000A.  I only use the 5000 during days when I have severe power-line noise.
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Bill -VA3WTB

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The WBN has been reported as working very well on power line noise.
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Pete - W6OP

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Thanks for the info. I don't use the NB or NR much at my location so that is not a big issue.

I don't use the second receiver for diversity reception but I do use the loop on 160 meters. Are you saying I can't have a separate receiving antenna on the 6500?
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Al K0VM, Elmer

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Pete,
  The 6500 has but one Signal Capture Unit ( SCU) which can only service one antenna at a time..  But you can receive on mulitple bands.
AL, K0VM
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Pete - W6OP

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Thats kind of a deal breaker. I really don't want to put out the money for a 6700 but I need my loop for 160 meters.
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Steve K9ZW, Elmer

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I don't see why you can't as the 6500 allows for more than one input.

You can only have ACTIVE one SCU, but that SCU can be configured a number of ways.

If I follow right you just want to use a receive loop on 160m but still broadcast on another antenna?

I believe the 6500 has provisions for a receive only antenna in addition. 

73

Steve K9ZW

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Pete - W6OP

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Yes, you are correct in what I want to do. I was just looking through the hardware manual and it does look like I can use a receive only antenna in addition to my transmitting antenna. Looking through the software manual now to see how to configure it.
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Bill -VA3WTB

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Yes Ant1 and Ant2
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Pete - W6OP

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Page 95 of the software manual shows me I can do what I want with a receive antenna.

Thanks for all the help guys!
Pete W6OP
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Ken - NM9P, Elmer

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Correct. You can transmit on one antenna and receive on another. You can receive on multiple frequencies at the same time. you just can't receive on two frequencies using two different receive antennas at the same time, except with a 6700.