Dropped Packets question

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Not being a network expert - what is considered acceptable for dropped packets? I have been running for a couple of hours on a laptop about 50 feet away from my wi-fi router. Packet drop is .06%. I'm thinking that is pretty good, but what do I know...
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Alan W4FBI

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Posted 3 years ago

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K6OZY, Elmer

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That is just fine actually.   Packets can be dropped for a variety of reasons such as Wireless congestion and DPC interrupts on the local PC.  If you were seeing chronic increasing packet drops or an increase in latency on your LAN, these would be indications of something amiss.   A well designed Wifi network with multiple hotspots dispersed through the home on different channels helps quite a bit too.   On 2.4Ghz 802.11b/g/n, the channel spacing should be Channel 1, 6 , 11.  This spacing lets you keep the access points out of each other's spectrum.   You can also install a WiFi sniffer and see what your neighbors are running too.  Then change your channels to be something different than theirs.   Many people have all of their 2.4Ghz networks on channel 6 and don't realize the issue this creates in a tight urban area.
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W5XZ - dan

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AA0KM

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This works well for me, wifi sniffing. (Freeware) .There are many out there like this one too.

You figure which channels are not used much and signals strengths so you can shift channels on your wifi system to keep away from interference. Not always fool proof though!

http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/wifi_information_view.html

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Tim - W4TME, Customer Experience Manager

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Upgrade to 5 GHz.  Leave 2.4 GHz behind.  All of my wireless network has been converted to 5 GHz and there is no shortage of clear channels - at least for now.
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Alan W4FBI

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Tim, I like this idea! I know my router has both frequencies, but not sure how to configure the computers for 5Ghz. I'll try Google in the meantime... thx

Alan
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WH6HI - Pat

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If you go to 5Ghz, check your transmission quality, that is signal strength.  You can get to a marginal signal level and a drop in data rate.  5Ghz does not have the same range as 2.4 does, anywhere from 50 and 75% less.  But if you have good strong signals then there is a very positive benefit to its use in that you will get more then twice the data rate with the  stronger signal.  Tom is correct check the channels used on 2.4 if that is your only option and select a channel that has less or no traffic on it.
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WH6HI - Pat

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Alan the 5Ghz is the function of the radio in your WI-FI router (if it is dual band) and the one in the computer If so equipped.
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Alan W4FBI

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Got it!! - just needed to upgrade the wifi driver on my laptop. Now - the 5GHz SSID shows up! You are correct - it's a little weaker. thx!

Alan