CQWW SSB 2017 post contest report

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  • Updated 2 years ago
Someone who shall remain nameless asked once on the CQ-contest list if anyone had placed in the top 10 single op with a Flex 6000 series radio. That was a darned good question, and I didn't really research thoroughly to see if anyone did. Anyway, I thought it would be a good idea to test that theory.

So this past weekend I did 40 hours in the chair, came up with 3.4M points assisted SOA and about 2400something QSOs. Based on current 3830 scores I'm about 6th place (USA) but it isn't over until CQ publishes the results. Here's hoping it holds!

I should note that I don't have a large station with multiple stacks. I have basically one high band antenna and a field of low band antennas. However I live in a decent-ish location with nice drop offs to Europe and Africa and a bit of a hill (high point state park and stokes state forest) toward JA. I thrive in conditions where the low bands are better, and the high bands are lower. I do run limited SO2R but that will change when I get the Power Genius XL and complete some other antenna work I've been putting off due to time commitments so I will run full high power SO2R with no lag between band changes.

I won't say that it has been flawless with the Flex but it has actually been quite good. There were a few quirks such as minor delays when switching SO2R but those are easy to work with and work around. I did not use Maestro as I am more of a point and click operator and 99% of my focus was on the N1MM+ logger, with the spectrum display which is supported in v2.0 of SmartSDR now. Who needs knobs? Some ops do, I don't. I do have a flexcontrol but it got little use.

Rates were pretty amazing and I found myself often doing 360+/hr rates for several minutes, with sustained hour rates around 170.



Anyway, this may be little pistol by some people's standards, but it's my best score ever in CQWW and I hope to improve. My goal was to get points for my contest club so we can win this year again. See you in sweepstakes and CQWW CW.
Photo of Ria - N2RJ

Ria - N2RJ, Elmer

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Posted 2 years ago

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Photo of Chris Tate  - N6WM

Chris Tate - N6WM, Elmer

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There is not difference between my driving up to my remote station, vs remoting in to it.  I am operating from the same location, a station that I have built.  If I remote some other station on the east coast, it would have to be a separate effort with a different call and would be considered operating from there and not part of the same effort.  In many instances, this is the only way for some of our fellow hams to compete, due to the many stringent HOA restrictions of today.  Its pretty straight forward, and has been written into the rules of contests, and other competitive activities like DXCC.
Photo of Mike - VE3CKO

Mike - VE3CKO, Elmer

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ok, then distance from radio. In shack, on same LAN, on via WAN.
Photo of Chris Tate  - N6WM

Chris Tate - N6WM, Elmer

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I dont really see the relevant need for such a rule.  Let me give you my scenario.  I have been building a station K6LRG for 10 years.  for many years I just drove up there and operated.  now I can remote into it.  I can drive up there..  anytime I want.  I have a fridge, A/C.. and some times I do, and some times I dont. But I am always operating from that station, same location, same signal.  whats the difference?
Photo of Chris Tate  - N6WM

Chris Tate - N6WM, Elmer

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Think of the internet link as a virtual extention of your headset.. and footswitch and cable from you paddle.  otherwise its exactly the same deal.