clean un install

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It seems that there is one common thread with most of the "Problems" associated with software not working .  Most raise their head within the Windows operating system.

For the past multiple upgrades with Flex software ,I have refused to use the un-installer built into the Windows XP,  7,  or 8 package.

It is very possible that this  different uninstall get's  the intended  results, allowing the  software upgrades a clean position .

There are many after market un installers I presently am using Revo Un-installer   (It,s free) and works.

When I say works  it removes the program and associated drivers,ddl's  orphans,artifax  . A really strong removal. (I wan't nothing left) 

Then I campaign with CCleaner which continues to Clean up the property .

Of course there are restarts on the computer  during this process.

However after doing this ,when I re install ,I get  fully functional  flex programming and how it was intended to operate  .

I would be the first in line to complain of any abnormality . But so far using the method I have described non such events have occurred. This will not conceal any Oops.
 

Why doesn't Flex do this . Well I think specific un installer formats for each and every upgrade would involve a pretty grand effort . I would rather see them emphases the development and proviso of the software than waste  time on Un Install. 

Com ports are another Windows moving target . For another day .
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np2g

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Posted 4 years ago

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Bob- W5TX

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I also use revo uninstaller. Good software.
(Edited)
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DrTeeth

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I have never used a third party uninstaller and have NEVER had any issues. I go through a LOT of software too. Software writers write their own uninstall scripts and if they can write the software, they can get the uninstall right, and they do. I also do not hide any Oops moments. Waste of money - don't even use them even though I know where to get them for free (;-)).
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Jim Gilliam

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I think the question you raised regarding uninstalling one of the most interesting subjects brought up. I have always wondered how an operating system would "know" how to completely remove a program. It would seem that the programmers could put bits and pieces of a program anywhere they choose and it would be virtually impossible for any software to know where these segments would lie on the hard drive. Most programs are put in folders which directly relates to the program and it is sometimes easy to manually remove the program.

It would seem to me that the only way a program could be completely removed wherever these bits and pieces lie, would be knowledge only the  programmer has. If I am correct on this thinking, it would seem that only the programmers would have the information to completely remove all vestiges of data, registry entries, and the programs itself and they should be responsible for writing the appropriate software to remove it.

However, if it is too work intensive to write this software, perhaps a compromise could be struck where the programmers could tell one where to manually go on the drive to manually effect a complete removal.


Jim



(Edited)
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Jim Gilliam

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Thank you for your sage information. As a related matter, I am a big fan of disk imaging. I take great care in imaging at regular intervals so that when doomsday does arrive I am a few minutes back to where my last image was made. Many say that you lose data and programs that way, but that depends on how religious one is in making regular images at times when you are pretty sure your computer is clean. This technique has saved me many hours of frustration trying to trouble shoot a hard drive gone awry.

With the availability of tera-byte hard drives, the cost is incidental to the convenience of never having to do much troubleshooting on a misbehaving program.

(Edited)
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DrTeeth

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I image my main PCs main OS every day - (I have at least 8 operating systems on each PC - don't ask, hi hi). That backup is stored in both an internal disk and copied to an external disk. I also have a couple of new hard disks in stock just in case 'it' hits the fan.

I also backup my email data separately too, to yet another hard disk. I also use Mailstore Home (free) to backup all my local and web-based accounts to a local database too.
(Edited)
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Jim Gilliam

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Sounds like you and I ought to have a beer some time.
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DrTeeth

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QTH: Barnet, North London
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Jim Gilliam

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I use the imaging software that comes with Windows 7. I have never, and I mean never, had a problem of reimaging using this software. Would be curious if you use the same imaging program. All of imaging is stored on a small WD USB 3.0 tera-byte drive. I recently purchased a solid state tera- byte USB drive and had success using that device.


Jim, K6QE

(Edited)
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np2g

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Since I have been shown this practice. Everything works. Every upgrade every time.
Very possible. By removing hard. There is nothing there which can or possibly conflict.

With the registry cleaning this too must help.

Does it solve the problem. Well it surly doesn't hurt or add to it.
So far I'm batting 100%. Others. Not participating are not as lucky.
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DrTeeth

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Same here with no uninstallers, or registry cleaners or anything else.
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Rick Hadley - W0FG

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The other thing that helps with a clean install is doing a reset of the radio to factory defaults, as described in the documentation.  I like the idea of doing a CClean of the registry too.  I haven't been doing that, but will the next time the issue arises.
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DrTeeth

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I would advise against doing a clean of the registry. Any cleaning program can only catch limited errors, many of which do no harm. They cannot tell if a registry key is causing an issue or not. I have used them in the past and so much strange behaviour or something suddenly being broken can be put down to it. They have very largely fallen out of favour these days. Look at the disclaimer MajorGeeks puts on any legacy listing of these programs before you start.
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Dale KB5VE

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I for one always clean up and uninstall before a upgrade. I remove the active program and the saved version if on the computer. I save a version to a stick drive to have incase I need it. I reboot and clean the system. Over kill maybe but it makes me feel better and that is all I care about. I have never had a issue with a new update except the ones all have.
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Bill-W9OL

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I do the same as Dale
save to a USB 3.0 hard drive (fast and ez)
Then employ both CCClearner and REVO
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np2g

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It is about un installing flex and it's cat. Dax components. Cleaning the system. And re installing the next version.

The. upgrade. I have. Ran windows 7flex uninstall. And loaded. The new Base line. Ok. Then loaded the new version flex. At this time I ran revo uninstall. And it found additional files that are part of the installed flex software.

So for a complete wash . Then A registry clean. Win 7 does not get the job done.

You have seen no load or irregular flex functions posted by me. Cannot say that for others. This is what we are talking about. Has it made a difference. Y. E. S.

I can absolutely guarantee if you use Software. audio systems. Professional audio. systems and attempt to use less than a similar campaign. It. Will. Not. Work. So there must be something value added.
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Bob- W5TX

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If you use a program like Revo, it uses the program uninstall script as a starting place and if all has been cleaned the process terminates but most software leaves some garbage behind to be cleaned up. Revo Performs this task. Registry cleaners imho are dangerous unless driven by a knowledgeable user. Kinda like driving a Ferrari on the freeway during rush hour.
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Jim Gilliam

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what does a knowledgeable user do differently than a unknowledgeable user when using a registry cleaner?
(Edited)
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np2g

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You have the opportunity to remove or keep  whatever is listed .
I consider everyone knowledgeable  Just don't shoot yourself in your foot .
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DrTeeth

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A knowledgable user does not use one. I guarantee that if you go down this road, you will find something acting strangely and forget that you cleared the registry some months ago and spend hours wasting your time. Been there, done that and got the badge. DO NOT USE THEM, please. See the "editor's note" halfway down this page http://www.majorgeeks.com/files/details/auslogics_registry_cleaner.html just above the screenshot.


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Bob G W1GLV

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Windows programmers have to take a lesson from Mac programmers.
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Bob- W5TX

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Bob-- roger roger roger. SSDR is only reason I have any association with Windows. Been there done that and have a dirtyT-shirt to prove it.
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Bob- W5TX

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Jim--A knowledgeable user is one who backs up the registry prior to pushing the clean button so that when all is hosed (guaranteed outcome at some point) you can recover. A log of folks just let the cleaner do it's thing by pushing the automatic clean or whatever it might be called.
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Jim Gilliam

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How does one back up the registry? I find your answer very interesting. I image my hard drive which indirectly backs up the registry, but it would be so cool to specifically back up the registry.
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DrTeeth

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1) Create a restore point

2) Search for any number of registry backer uppers that exist

3) Search 'registry backup'

You can also backup sections before you fiddle with them by exporting them to a REG file which can be used to overwrite changes.
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np2g

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AH !!!!!  I see you went to the Windows Help files.   Good to read 
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Bob- W5TX

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Jim--Jim go to start programs and type regedit. When in regedit under files find export. Select and save.
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np2g

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OK looks like some pretty good no's  and some pretty good yes's .

For the record I say it works . 

I could really sweeten the pot and reveal WHO also does it but NA!!!  

I'll stick with " Kill bill   and erase their minds "   and please whoever stick with whatever you  are using.

Will compare notes after a while again.
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Bob- W5TX

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Jim - here is procedure for Win 7.
Go to Start, type regedit.exe in the search box, and then press Enter. If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
In Registry Editor, locate and click the registry key or subkey that you want to back up.
Click File > Export.
In the Export Registry File dialog box, select the location where you want to save the backup copy to, and then type a name for the backup file in the File name field.
Click Save.