Can use my Acer laptop with Intel dual core processor with the 6300?

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I am seriously considering the purchase of a 6300 and I have an Acer "Inspire" laptop computer with the Intel T-3200 series dual core processor at 2Ghz.  Also 2GB of DDR2 ram.  Will this computer work with the radio using Smart SDR?  Or will the performance suffer too greatly?
Photo of Roger Warrick

Roger Warrick

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Posted 3 years ago

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Andrew Russell

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Roger,

I have a 6500 and  the main factor seems to be the 2D graphics. 1Gig is the aim.

Mostly a dedicated card.

More recent on board graphics processors seem ok.

My 5yo Core2Duo with limited shared graphics memory is not up to the current SSDR product.

More Cache is also good.

Andrew

(Edited)
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Tim - W4TME, Customer Experience Manager

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The short answer is you can run SmartSDR with the FLEX-6300 on your laptop, but you may not be pleased with the performance.  The CPU is a little under powered and 2 GB of RAM will make Windows performance sluggish.  The additional RAM resource consumption that is needed to do the spectrum rending and saving the waterfall history data in SmartSDR  will be the biggest hurdle to overcome.

Here are the specs for running SmartSDR from the product page on the web site (http://www.flexradio.com/amateur-products/flex-6000-signature-series/smartsdr/):

"Minimum required CPU for SmartSDR is an Intel i3 2100T or an AMD Athlon Phenom II and greater. Lesser processors may not perform adequately when displaying multiple or full screen spectrum displays.  However for the optimal user experience, as most hams run multiple applications along with SmartSDR for Windows such as loggers and digital mode programs, a quad-core CPU or greater is highly recommended. SmartSDR for Windows is a WPF (Windows Presentation Foundation) application which can utilize the hardware acceleration capabilities in a video card’s graphics processing unit (GPU) for optimal rendering of high definition spectrum displays."
(Edited)