AM Demodulation Quality Flex-6000 VS Others

  • 1
  • Problem
  • Updated 5 years ago
  • Acknowledged
While using my 6500 to check into the local 75 meter AM net I became frustrated trying to copy the other stations. I experienced this with the 6300 also.
 
AM amateur signals show up on the scope with a huge carrier and tiny modulation and the audio seems the same. Selective fading is so pronounced as to make speech difficult to make out, weak and distorted. No amount of AGC-T, bandwidth or other changes seems to help. No, NR wasn't on!
Using the SAM mode helps some however even it lacks good quality. 

So during the NET I fired up a few other receiver to compare. First my 75A4 then the RCA AR-88, IC-706, R390A and finally the TS-2000. All provided much better demodulation and lacked the severe distortion from selective fading. Of course I was using the same antenna. FYI The TS-2000 did better than the others. The other stations's carrier acted to quieten the receiver noise, as it should, and speech was clear and understandable.  The Flex doesn't seem to respond to the carrier and quieten the band noise as the others do. It's as if the carrier isn't actually there. 

Interestingly, AM stations on the BC band sound pretty good, great in fact at least until you open the bandwidth over 6khz then you begin to get a lot of hiss. I can't really claim that this is any better than my 70 year tube receivers however. 

So my question is....What have others experienced in comparison to other receivers? Is there hope for improvement with SSDR's demodulation ability? 

CW and SSB are just awesome and far better than the others, even my K3 (Which BTW also stunk on AM). Sorry to say, AM just doesn't cut it.
73
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Steve N4LQ

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Posted 5 years ago

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Tim - W4TME, Customer Experience Manager

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Official Response
I have entered this problem report into our bug tracker for additional investigation. Thank you for the defect report.